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Franchise Times Zor Awards

Which franchise is best for you? We describe three types



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Healthcare Pro

Healthcare Pro

The type: Healthcare practitioners, from chiropractors to physical therapists and beyond, often enjoy providing care but dislike insurance and regulation, and turn to franchising.

Franchises that fit: Look for brands with well-developed systems to handle the above, especially regulation that varies state-by-state, and strong brand names.

The pluses: A health-related franchise will likely command better real estate spots and attract more consumers than an independent, at least after enough units are sold.

The pitfalls: This industry is experiencing the new gold rush of franchising, like restaurants did decades ago, and only some of those brands will ultimately be successful.

Advice: Talk with multiple franchisees to examine the business model before signing, especially the number of clients one provider can see in a day and what that means for profits.

In real life: Liz Olson, our model, is office manager and audience development guru at Franchise Times, where she keeps our circulation numbers strong and growing.


Franchise Times Zor Awards

Introduction/Methodology
For your consideration
How we chose the Zor Awards

The Zor Awards
Fast-Casual Pizza
Dog Vs. Cat People
Cheap Seats
Hands On
Feel Like a Kid Again
Drive-Thru Classics
Better Burgers
Personal Wellness
Fixer Upper
New Wave Medical

Types of Zees
Healthcare Pro
Pet-Care Operators
Corporate Refugee
The Superdog

Pet-Care Operator

Pet-Care Operator

The type: Many people who love animals look to pet care franchises as an excellent way to turn their passion into profits.

Franchises that fit: Dog daycares are booming, with brands ranging from high-end “hotels” for dogs to rustic pet playgrounds, as are mobile services and pet-focused retailers.

The pluses: That’s an easy one for pet enthusiasts: You get to play with dogs (and at some franchises, cats and other furry friends) all day, and build a community.

The pitfalls: Some top lines just aren’t big enough to sustain an operator, and there’s also A LOT of physical and dirty work—aka dog poop, everywhere.

Advice: Plan to be engaged with the community, so everyone knows about the franchise and it becomes a gathering place. This goes for many kinds of retail brands, of course.

In real life: Xavier Brantley-Schauls is a model with a sharp fashion sense, an aspiring filmmaker and a server in one of Minneapolis’ hot spots, Hell’s Kitchen.


Corporate Refugee

Corporate Refugee

The type: Many mid- or late-career execs get sick of working for the man, or are relieved of their duties by the powers that be, and strike out on their own.

Franchises that fit: Big operations with real estate requirements like restaurants or educational franchises can make use of well-developed skill sets.

The pluses: Execs who had broad responsibilities often have great command of the big picture, and decades of expertise.

The pitfalls: Former C-level officers often get used to fat salaries, sumptuous perks and large staffs, and they won’t see those heights for at least a few years, if ever, as a franchisee.

Advice: Figure out your strengths and weaknesses, and then find business partners or employees who fill your gaps.

In real life: Our model, Jeff Amann, is COO for Welcov, a multi-state healthcare provider, and not coincidentally, the husband of FT’s editor-in-chief. (Thanks, Jeff.)


The Superdog

Norman is an Australian Shepherd and Border Collie mix who surprised his parent, Tom Kaiser of Franchise Times, by being a perfect supermodel at the photo shoot for the Zor Awards. Good boy, Norman!

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