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Oh, to be an intern again, aka ‘aspiring millennial’


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Twenty-three-year old son Sam had a friend, Dylan, with a job I thought sounded like a scream: driving the Mr. Peanut truck around the country for one year, and wearing the Mr. Peanut suit at functions along the way. This was affectionately named “The 2015 Nutmobile Tour,” and concluded with a professional YouTube video of Dylan dancing with the Louisiana Dance Collective (ala Mr. Peanut). C’mon. You’re 22 with no ties? One year on the road with a bunch of other millennials in a big nutmobile? Freakishly fun.

I thought about Dylan (who now has a “real” job in the workaday world) when I read Editor-at-Large Nancy Weingartner’s story this month on franchisor World of Beer and their efforts to do a little millennial marketing. Four lucky interns get the opportunity to travel the world for four months, tasting beer and using social media to talk about it. Few 23-year-olds would turn away from that gig. In fact, there are some older folks who might raise their hand for the same opportunity. World of Beer CEO Paul Avery told Nancy that “baby boomers are aspirational millenials.” (Although I’m not sure I appreciate that comment, I’m not sure it is untrue.)

As you may have noticed, looming on our front cover this month with an impish grin is none other than NFL quarterback and superstar Drew Brees, profiled in these pages two years ago as a Jimmy John’s franchisee. But we revisit him this month, or should I say, Tom Kaiser, associate editor did: Tom was whisked away in Brees’ private plane, spending some quality time with the football legend talking about his new investment: Walk-On’s.

Brees took what he learned from Jimmy John’s and brought it to the young founders of the sports bar. Now an investor in the franchisor, Brees has brought his values and character, as well as his love for franchising itself, to help grow the business. You’ll want to see how the founders caught the eye of such a high-caliber investor.

In each issue, we bring you many stories with happy endings, like those of the people winning awards through the International Franchise Association’s Franchising Gives Back program. Don’t miss the story of Tabbassum Mumtaz, whose own past, which includes immigrating here from Pakistan, has brought him to the place where giving back is second nature. He works more so he can give more.

Mary Jo Larson

Mary Jo Larson

Publisher
Reach Mary Jo at 612-767-3208
or mlarson@franchisetimes.com

Not all franchise stories do have happy endings, however. I have to give it up to Editor-in-Chief Beth Ewen this month in her Continental Franchise Review column, where she outlined the sticky saga of Submarina, a sub sandwich chain. There are a lot of twists and turns along the way: delinquent franchisees, bankruptcy, a founder’s son pushed from his CEO job, an investor turned CEO and grand larceny—all rolled into one scorched tale.

And we also provide the useful: This month features our expanded finance section, because, as we all know, capital makes everything happen. Not only does Franchise Times reporter Nick Upton get inside one of the larger private equity firms in the sector, he also reports on the elusive investors few know anything about: family offices. They’re out there, but how do you find them? Plus, we’ve laid out our annual finance and real estate directory to put these sources at your fingertips—there when you need them.

We’ve got it all this month, including a story of the Big Easy and its comeback, robots, moving downtown and more. And because we would be crazy not to have our own election coverage, we’ve even profiled Hillary. Just call us nuts. 

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