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Something to Add to Your Bucket List: KFC Finger-Licking Good Nail Polish


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A young girl in Hong Kong takes a picture of KFC's Finger-Licking Good Nail Polish with her iPhone.

Ogilvy & Mather Group, Hong Kong

In the United States, KFC diners will just have to be content with licking the chicken grease off their fingers in order to get the same effect their counterparts in Hong Kong can get by polishing their nails with KFC’s latest promotion: chicken-flavored nail polish.

The limited-edition “polish,” which is really more sauce than varnish, comes in two colors and flavors—red for hot and spicy and pinkish-beige as original. With all the nail art now trending, we think they missed the target by not including a third option, extra-crunchy.

Don’t expect to see the polish rolled out in the U.S.; it’s purely a promotion for the Asian market, whose youth thrives on innovation. “The response has been phenomenal,” Anna Mugglestone, marketing and communications director for Ogilvy & Mather in Hong Kong, the firm responsible for the idea, wrote in an email. “We had over 450 pieces of press coverage since we launched the product and we were a No. 1 trending topic on Twitter last week (May 2-9).”

In keeping with how fast millennials and their still younger counterparts, Gen Z, move on,  the shelf life of the polish is only about five days, according to cosmeticdesign-asia.com. But depending on how many times you lick it off, you could be well into your third bottle by the expiration date. Once the bottle is opened, however, it must be applied and licked off in real time. 

No word on any other beauty products KFC is working on, but we’re betting on The Colonel’s corn kernel gold crowns for teeth (watch out, Burger King) or buttermilk biscuit bun inserts for flat derrieres.

Once the U.S. KFC spins off its China division by the end of the year as expected, it can go back to concentrating on getting more Americans to polish off more buckets of its fried chicken and licking their own fingers without the outside aid of artificial flavors. 

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The latest news, opinions and commentary on what's happening in the franchise arena that could affect your business.

Tom KaiserTom Kaiser is associate editor of Franchise Times. He can be reached at 612.767.3209, or send story ideas to tkaiser@franchisetimes.com.
 
Beth EwenBeth Ewen is editor-in-chief of Franchise Times. She can be reached at 612.767.3212, or send story ideas to bewen@franchisetimes.com.
 
Nicholas UptonNicholas Upton is staff writer at Franchise Times. He can be reached at 612.767.3226, or send story ideas to nupton@franchisetimes.com.
 
Mary Jo LarsonLaura Michaels is managing editor of Franchise Times. She can be reached at 612.767.3210, or send story ideas to lmichaels@franchisetimes.com.
 
Mary Jo LarsonMary Jo Larson is the publisher of Franchise Times Magazine and the Restaurant Finance Monitor.  You can find her on Twitter at
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Nancy WeingartnerNancy Weingartner is editor-at-large of Franchise Times magazine and the editor of the Food On Demand media project. You can reach her at 612-767-3200 or at nancyw@franchisetimes.com.
Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/nanweingartner.
 

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